How to plant lavender

How to plant lavender

How to plant lavender

How to plant Lavender

According to David Salaman, founder and chief horticulturist at High Country Gardens, lavenders are some of America’s best herbal shrubs for the Waterwise garden.

They provide us with beautiful spring and summer flowers, are excellent for attracting pollinators, and provide us with the wonderful, relaxing aroma of their flowers and foliage.

The main types of lavenders are the Spanish lavender, the English lavender, and the French hybrid lavender. They all have a place in the garden.

Spanish lavenders are best for mild winter climates. They’re hardy to roughly zone 7, mostly zone 8 and warmer.

French hybrid lavenders are hardy down to zone 6.

The most cold-hardy are the English lavenders and, the most widely-planted across the country.

How to plant lavender?

Remove the lavender plants from their shipping pots. Start with loosening the root ball from the sides of the pots by just gently squeezing the sides. You can push up from the bottom. Don’t grab them by the hair and pull them out of the pot because that can cause some damage. Instead, gently put your fingers across the top of the soil, turn the pot upside down, and gently lift the pot off. Sometimes you have to push down on the bottom a little bit.

Loosen it a little more and gently lift the pot off of the root ball. Now, to prepare the roots for planting, it’s very important to scratch them out, physically cutting through the roots. Where you cut a root, where there’s one cut, you’ll get two or three new roots so it’s a very beneficial thing to do so don’t be afraid. You can use the corner of a tag or a pocket knife and you want to make a series of vertical, quarter inch deep cuts on the sides of the pots, particularly the corners. Run it right down the corner. Cut those roots. Come to the bottom, you can see a nice mat of roots on the bottom so you want to do a crosshatch because if you don’t do this, the roots are going to hold the shape of the pot and the plant really won’t grow out into the surrounding soil and will tend to be stunted. Now just gently, with your fingertips, rough out the sides of the root ball so it has a fuzzy look.

It’s ready to plant in a previously prepared hole with the equivalent soil amendments. Place the plant down in the hole. In the Western United States or arid climates, plant slightly deeper than the surrounding soil. In moister climates east of the Mississippi, you want to plant level with the surrounding soil. Gently fill in with the amended backfill. With the tips of your fingers or your trowel, just gently firm the soil into place with the additional soil. Make a well, or a saucer, around the plant to hold the irrigation water. Proper watering and irrigation after transplanting is just essential to overall transplanting success. So here we have a nice saucer that will hold a decent amount of water.

The tag is not only good for scratching out the roots but it will identify the plants that you’re putting into the garden so include those in the hole. Just stick it into the side.

Remember this:

The French hybrid lavenders are summer bloomers. The more cold hardy English lavenders, are generally late-spring and early-summer blooming. So by planting both English lavenders and the French hybrids, you can have 8 to 10 weeks of blooming lavender plants out in your garden. Utilize them both.

If you’re in a milder climate, the Spanish lavenders bloom very early and, generally, you won’t use them in most places where you plant the English and French hybrid varieties. In terms of plant care on your lavenders, water regularly. A good, deep soaking. Fill the little saucer, or well, twice every time you water and do this one to three times a week depending on the daytime highs.

Lavender is very sensitive to not enough water so you want to be sure that you soak them thoroughly when you do water and do this right through the first growing season. You can plant lavenders in spring and fall but in zone 5 climates, I generally recommend sticking to a spring schedule for your lavender plantings and when pruning, do not fall prune. You want to let the lavender stand over the winter and then come back in mid-spring. You wait until they start to wake up a little and you see a little bit of green along the stem and then you do your mid-spring pruning. You can deadhead the plants during the summer growing season and that’s desirable but, again, do not prune hard in the fall because that will weaken the lavender plants and might prevent them from coming through the winter in good shape.

The biggest mistake in planting lavenders is basically not watering them enough. So water thoroughly and watch the color of the plants. If they get a little pale and yellow, you may be watering a little too much but, in general, when the weather is hot, they’re a thirsty plant that first growing season.

Source: This text is a transcript of a beautiful video on how to plant lavender. It provides you at the same time with a great provider of English and French lavender plants.

Some useful links to start with

New to gardening start here  https://www.highcountrygardens.com/gardening

How to attract bees in your garden https://www.highcountrygardens.com/gardening/bees-in-the-garden-our-most-important-pollinators/

Planting guides

View or Download the Planting Guide for Perennials & Bulbs (pdf) 

Planting Guides: Soil Preparation

I hope you enjoyed this transcript.

Let me know your favorite lavender plants, how to plant them and also where you find them. Thank you!

Spring, Nature VS Insect Repellents

Daily Lavender Oil Solutions

Spring, Nature VS Insect Repellents

Most of us see spring as a exceptional season. It is a time for renewal. Everything is fresh and brand new. New baby animals are being born, like fawns and bunnies.

So many colors are springing up with fresh new flowers, beautiful red roses, vibrant violet lavender plants, and many more. Not to mention the eye opening, deep green, new grass. All the wonderful sights and smells makes this a great season to have on this beautiful earth.

Be Cautious

However, just as much as spring is a glorious time it can also be a very annoying time. As there are brand new things being born and springing up there is also those pesky insects and bugs being born and coming out of hiding as well. Bugs and insects like mosquitoes, fleas, spiders, ticks, and even flies.

Being annoying is only one small problem with these types of bugs and insects. The bigger problems with these are they can also carry diseases, like tick fever, Malaria, and even yellow fever. This is why it is so important that in this beautiful season we make sure to take precautions against these insects and bugs.

Now you can always go to your local retail store and buys chemical products to help keep these bugs at bay. You know the usual things like OFF or Citronella candles. But do you realize by buying these type of products you could be doing just as much harm to yourself as these bugs can be doing to you?

I mean stop and think about it for a minute. These products have a horrible smell that comes from all the chemicals they use. And if you have ever used a product like OFF, then you know after using it your skin feels kinda sticky.

Why? Well that is those wonderful chemicals they are using to either kill the bugs or ward them off. Now here is the kicker of it, those chemicals are going into your body! Yes those chemicals are now soaking through your skin and into your system. Hmm right!

Well the Citronella candles you don’t apply to yourself so they can’t be harmful can they? Sorry to say but yes they can still be very harmful. You breathe in the chemicals that it puts off in the air and this is still entering your body.

Some pretty scary thoughts right! I don’t know about you, but for me I have set out to find better ways to fight off these harmful bugs without doing more harm to me. So you want to know what I have found?

Natural Solutions

You can take a deep breathe there is good news! You can fight off these pests in an all natural and safe way. Nature has provided us with several great tools.

Nature’s Tools

  • Lavender plants
  • Vanilla
  • Lemon grass
  • Petunias
  • Marigolds
  • Rosemary
  • Oregano

These are just a small handful of natural plants and flowers that can help fight off bugs like spiders, mosquitoes, fleas and ticks.

Although most of us thoroughly enjoy the smell of these, bugs and insects often hate the smell and look of these plants. And in the end they have more of a tendency to avoid areas that have these plants/flowers in them.

Don’t have room for flower beds? No worries there! Some of these nature’s tools can also be found in essential oils as well. You can take these oils and spray or apply them to your body as well. And because these are all natural this is completely safe (unless you are allergic, then please do not apply)

That’s right these essential oils can work just as effectively as live plants. Not to mention with the oils you can also pour them in a small container and spread them around the inside of your house to help ward off these harmful and pesky bugs as well.

Which One Will You Choose?

Now that leaves you with making a choice. When spring starts rolling in are you going to go into a retail store and buy one of these products like OFF and Citronella candles? Yes these will help you ward off pesky and dangerous bugs. However, at the same time could be just as harmful if not more so to you.

Or does nature’s way sound more like a better option to you? Not only will you have a glorious looking yard, but you will also free of chemicals and pest free. Better for your health and fabulous smells!

©️ Melissa Hazlett

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